3C
DDP-24

TRANSISTORIZED 24 BIT COMPUTER
INTRODUCED 1961





DDP-24 S BLOCKS (3C BLOC - SERIES S)

MAX MATHEWS IS CONSIDERED BY MANY TO BE THE FATHER OF COMPUTER MUSIC
IN 1970 MATHEWS DEVELOPED THE GROOVE SYSTEM (GENERATED REAL-TIME OUTPUT OPERATIONS ON VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED EQUIPMENT) ON A DDP-24 AND DDP-224
ONE COULD MANIPULATE COMPUTER SOUND IN REAL-TIME

IN AN INTERVIEW WITH BARRY VERCOE OF MIT - HE MENTIONS MAX MATHEWS AND THE DDP-24 SYSTEM MATHEWS USED TO CREATE "GROOVE" AND LATER DONATED TO MIT

" We began that work when I first arrived in 1971. The first studio we had was in the basement of Building 26, where we had a computer given to MIT by Max Mathews-the Honeywell DDP-24.
Max initially developed his Groove system on this machine and was kind enough to give it to MIT when I joined the faculty.
It was a well-worn piece of hardware, but I was ably assisted in its maintenance and software development by MIT graduate Steve Haflich..
That computer was put into the basement room at the far end of Building 26, just at the time they started constructing Buildings 36 and 38, the new EE buildings.
There was lots of construction going on next door to Building 26; they had to dig down deep.
The roads here aren't too high above the water level and the river, so there was lots of flooding.
I think when they drove in the piles for the new buildings, Building 26 actually cracked a little. Anyway, we had basement flooding.
Fortunately, the DDP-24 was high enough off the ground that we never had problems from the six or eight inches of water that we would sometimes find in the studio."

THESE APPEAR TO BE S BLOCKS FROM THE DDP-24 SYSTEM MATHEWS USED TO CREATE THE GROOVE SYSTEM AND LATER DONATED TO MIT
MATHEWS SIGNATURE ON THE SIDE IS SIMILAR TO KNOWN EXAMPLES AND THERE ARE TWO MIT BUILDING 26 STAMPS

OBTAINED WITH AN ORIGINAL 3C S-PAC MODULE MANUAL

 

 

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